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What is Summer Depression .. and How Does it Affect Your Life?

Saturday, August 7, 2021

What is Summer Depression .. and How Does it Affect Your Life?
Depression - archive photo

" Depression Summer", which is also referred to as seasonal affective disorder reverse officially refers to major depressive disorder, a form of disorder seasonal affective , which ignites during the summer, usually come back every year at about the same time, according to the site verywellmind Contrary Autumn and winter seasonal affective disorder—which typically presents with low energy, pervasive sadness, daytime fatigue, and a lack of activity—Individuals with summer social anxiety disorder often develop opposite symptoms.


Symptoms of summer depression are often opposite to those associated with fall and winter social anxiety disorder .


For most people with summer depression, symptoms begin in late spring or early summer and end in fall. Some of the most common symptoms include anxiety, insomnia, weight loss, and decreased appetite.


There have been many theories about why people get depressed during the summer months. There are some specific theories that many experts point to when looking at the cause of summer depression, the most prominent of which is exposure to a lot of sunlight in the summer months leading to changes in the body's internal clock or Circadian rhythm. When this happens, your melatonin production is lower, and the sleep-wake cycle ends, resulting in disrupted sleep patterns .


Other theories that may explain why some people develop seasonal depression in the summer include :


An increase in the number of pollen grains.


High temperatures.


Increasing the number of hours of the day.


Extreme heat.


Insufficient sleep.


While seasonal depression in winter and summer can affect anyone, there are certain groups of people in which SAD is more common:


It occurs in women four times more than in men.


The age of onset is most commonly estimated between 18 and 30 years.


Having a family history of other types of mood disorders.

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