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Video Games help Boost Children's Intelligence

Tuesday, May 17, 2022


Video Games help Boost Children's Intelligence
Video Games


According to a new study, playing video games, watching TV, or surfing social media can help children improve their IQ.


Children's IQ is Boosted by Video Games


The study discovered that playing video games, rather than watching TV or surfing social media, can help children improve their IQ.


Children spend 2.5 hours a day watching television and one hour playing video games, according to the experts, and spending more time playing video games can boost IQ.


Although many parents feel bad when their children spend lengthy hours staring at devices, and some even worry that it may make them less clever, the researchers said the findings should calm parents concerned about screen usage.


More than 5,000 US children aged 10 to 12 were tested by researchers from Sweden's Karolinska Institutet to assess their general cognitive abilities.

The findings revealed that those who played games more than the average boosted their intelligence by roughly 2.5 IQ points higher than the average between the two measurements, with no evidence of a good or negative effect of watching TV or using social media.


Psychological Exams Aided in The Study's Conclusion


Children who played more video games in ten years were not wiser on average than children who did not, but they exhibited the highest intelligence after two years, according to Torkel Klingberg, professor of cognitive neuroscience in the Department of Neuroscience.


The researchers devised a five-task intelligence index that included two reading comprehension and vocabulary tests, one attention and executive function test, one visuospatial processing test, and one learning capacity test.


The researchers were able to analyse how children's performance altered from one test session to the next by repeating psychological examinations every two years and controlling for individual differences on the first test.


They also took into account genetic variances that could affect intellect, as well as disparities in parents' educational backgrounds and income.


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